BibTeX

@mastersthesis{MASOTLFHSM16,
	author	 = {Jakob Lüttgau},
	title	 = {{Modeling and Simulation of Tape Libraries for Hierarchical Storage Management Systems}},
	advisors	 = {Julian Kunkel},
	year	 = {2016},
	month	 = {04},
	school	 = {Universität Hamburg},
	howpublished	 = {{Online \url{https://wr.informatik.uni-hamburg.de/_media/research:theses:jakob_l__ttgau_modeling_and_simulation_of_tape_libraries_for_hierarchical_storage_management_systems.pdf}}},
	type	 = {Master's Thesis},
	abstract	 = {The wide variety of storage technologies (SRAM, NVRAM, NAND, Disk, Tape, etc.) results in deep storage hierarchies to be the only feasible choice to meet performance and cost requirements when dealing with vast amounts of data. In particular long term storage systems employed by scientific users are mainly reliant on tape storage, as they are still the most cost-efficient option even 40 years after their invention in the mid-seventies. Current archival systems are often loosely integrated into the remaining HPC storage infrastructure. However, data analysis tasks require the integration into the scratch storage systems. With the rise of exascale systems and in situ analysis also burst buffers are likely to require integration with the archive. Unfortunately, exploring new strategies and developing open software for tape archive systems is a hurdle due to the lack of affordable storage silos, the resulting lack of availability outside of large organizations and due to increased wariness requirements when dealing with ultra durable data. Eliminating some of these problems by providing virtual storage silos should enable community-driven innovation, and enable site operators to add features where they see fit while being able to verify strategies before deploying on test or production systems. The thesis asseses moderns tape systems and also puts their development over time into perspective. Subsequently, different models for the individual components in tape systems are developed. The models are then implemented in a prototype simulation using discrete event simulation. It is shown that the simulation can be used to approximate the behavior of tape systems deployed in the real world and to conduct experiments without requiring a physical tape system.},
}